refugees


Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan laughs and shakes hands with State Refugee Coordinator Kit Taintor at the Immigration Welcome Event on Wednesday Feb. 22, 2017 at Union Station.
Photo by McKenzie Lange/Aurora Sentinel

Amid constantly evolving immigration and deportation policies handed down by President Donald Trump’s administration — including a new executive order signed March 6 and banning travel from certain countries — city officials recently re-upped the debate on Aurora’s disputed tag as a “sanctuary city.” The term remains without a formal definition from the federal government


From left: Blake Stephenson, Samuel Tadesse, Dallas Johnson, Adwoa Tweneboa-Koduah, Anaya Richie and Onyi Ozoma. The group of RHS students is trying to raise $20,000 for a trip to Washigton, D.C.

“I am an immigrant, I came here in 2012 from Ghana, I am an African-American woman. For me, it was like constantly being attacked by someone who was suppose to represent our country and, to a certain extent, you feel kind of weak. But on trips like these, you realize there are people who have fought for you to be here and you’re not just going to let one person take that from you.”


Abdul Alkekhai sits with his son, Zean Alkekhai, as he shares his experiences and fears as a Syrian refugee on Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014 at The Mango House.
Photo by McKenzie Lange/Aurora Sentinel

‘It’s been really heartbreaking to look in the eyes of our community members when they say ‘My 18-year-old son was supposed to come in one week … is that really not happening?” said Jill Fricker, executive director of the Colorado African Organization. ‘And our response is, ‘The way we understand it, that is not happening.”