Aurora man found guilty of beating his grandfather to death

Frans Vanbommel, 84, interceded in an argument and told his grandson to be respectful of his grandmother. Prosecutors said Jason Vanbommel flew into a rage, throwing things and yelling profanities. When the grandfather tried to use the phone to call 911, the grandson began punching him in the head with "full-strength blows." When Frans Vanbommel fell to the floor, the grandson kicked him in the torso, fracturing his ribs.

VanBommel Jason

Jason Vanbommel

AURORA | An Aurora man has been found guilty of beating his 84-year-old grandfather to death during an argument that started over shrimp.

An Arapahoe County jury this week found Jason Vanbommel, 34, guilty of a second-degree felony count of first-degree assault of an at-risk adult, and a fourth-degree felony county of reckless manslaughter, among other charges, according to a news release from 18th Judicial District Director of Communications Vikki Migoya.

According to prosecutors, Vanbommel’s grandmother was preparing dinner Dec. 29, 2015, when Vanbommel started arguing with her over the shrimp she planned to prepare. Frans Vanbommel, 84, interceded and told his grandson to be respectful of his grandmother. Prosecutors said Jason Vanbommel flew into a rage, throwing things and yelling profanities. When the grandfather tried to use the phone to call 911, the grandson began punching him in the head with “full-strength blows.” When Frans Vanbommel fell to the floor, the grandson kicked him in the torso, fracturing his ribs.

Jason Vanbommel left the home and police were called to the scene.

Frans Vanbommel  was admitted to a hospital and died Jan. 6.

“Frans Vanbommel deserved to live out his life in peace and safety surrounded by his family,” said the head prosecutor on the case, Chief Deputy District Attorney Brian Sugiocki. “Instead, he died horribly at the hands of his own grandson.

“With this verdict, the jury made clear that elder abuse will not be tolerated in this community, regardless of whether it is perpetrated by a complete stranger or a member of the victim’s family,” Sugiocki added.

Vanbommel could face between 16 and 48 years in prison for the Class 2 felony first-degree assault of an at-risk adult conviction.

At a hearing April 18, Judge Phillip Douglass determined Vanbommel was a habitual criminal, rendering him eligible for increased penalties. Sentencing is scheduled for June 16.