2017 CITY COUNCIL: Who best can represent dynamic Original Aurora at stake in Ward I


AURORA | Sally Mounier is hoping to hold on to her seat as the Aurora City Council’s Ward I representative, but she faces a challenge from Crystal Murillo, the 23-year-old candidate who grew up in the ward.

Murillo is the daughter of immigrants, a renter and first in her family to earn a college degree — all things she says she believes better aligns her with the diversity of the ward. Mounier has lived in Ward I for nearly 20 years, and, like Murillo, wants to keep the ward affordable and desirable for its residents, especially as home prices and rents continue to grow around the Denver metro area.

“I’m adamantly opposed to gentrification,” Mounier said during an Aurora Channel 8 candidate forum, despite development, such as the Anschutz Medical Campus and surrounding projects, popping up within the ward.

Murillo had similar thoughts on the topic during the forum.

“We are at risk of gentrification,” Murillo said of her home in Ward I. “(We’re at risk) of losing people who have called Aurora home for decades.”

Murillo lives with her grandparents who have called the Ward home for decades.

Mounier said Ward I still has affordable housing, a major selling point for many moving into the ward and is slated to be the perfect community for those who work in the medical field, but make substantially less money than a doctor does.

Both also support the city utilizing incentives to lure companies, such as the Gaylord hotel and Amazon.

“We are very deliberative,” Mounier said of council’s role in granting incentives. “We do not offer incentives when willy-nilly.”

Similarly, Murillo said the city should be careful in how it disburses such incentives.

“I don’t oppose growing for the sake of growing,” Murillo said. “It has to meet our community’s needs.”

Along the east Colfax corridor, where Aurora’s homeless population is most visible, Mounier said she would be open to building some sort of campus that has multiple resources for the homeless. Murillo also agreed that the city must act in some capacity to help that population, but so far doesn’t have a detailed plan in how that should happen.

When it came to the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, which city council took up in late September, the candidates both say they support it.

But Mounier moved to send a resolution that would have declared Aurora’s support of DACA to a policy committee for “further development” last month. Mounier said she believed the resolution should include more on comprehensive immigration reform, including border security, before council makes a decision. It’s not clear when that resolution will be back before council.

“I am totally on record of support, finding a permanent solution for the DACA kids, but I want to assure the public that for me DACA is only one part of a huge immigration issue that has to be dealt with by the Congress of the United States, not the city officials,” Mounier said during the forum. “So my thought is let’s get in front of our congressmen and senators and pass immigration reform.”

Murillo said she supported the policy, and that people, many around her age, that were brought to this country illegally at no fault of their own, should not be penalized, but rather embraced by their community.

While Murillo supports Aurora adopting the title, Mounier sees the designation as a declaration to not follow the law.

“We follow it (the law) or we don’t,” Mounier said during the forum. “Are we going to pick and choose what laws we are going to obey? For me, we’re going to follow the law.”

On transportation, the two have different ideas. Mounier believes maintenance of Aurora’s roads is most pressing, while Murillo said “fixing roads is a Band-aid,” and a great deal of emphasis should be made on how the city’s transportation infrastructure will accommodate growth.

She points to Englewood for a model.

“They provide a free shuttle service throughout their city that connects to major business hubs and to the light rail. The shuttle not only increases mobility for residents but improves business access,” Murillo said in a candidate questionnaire. “It runs along a public art route, which if Aurora replicated could improve the community feel of our city, and be an opportunity to employ local artists as well.”

Sally Mounier Bio & Issue Q&A

Sally Mounier is running to hold her seat as the councilwoman for Ward I, where she has been a resident for 18 years. She was appointed to the Ward I seat in 2012 after losing a bid for the House District 42 seat. A year later, Mounier was elected to continue to represent Ward I. Mounier worked for RE/MAX Denver Southeast for 20 years where she specialized in agent recruitment and retention.

QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO YOUR ELECTION RACE:
Q) Green lights or red lights? Photo red-light cameras in Aurora continue to be controversial, especially since a body of state lawmakers continue to threaten to make them illegal. As a city lawmaker, would you recommend the city continue its own program? 
A) Under no circumstance would I be willing to continue the Photo Red program.
Q) Denver has agreed to allow some bars and coffee shops the open use of marijuana, or to create private cannabis clubs. Would you permit them? If not, why? If yes, how? 
A) It is way too early to decide something like MJ bars/coffee shops for Aurora.  We need to wait another few years before we tackle new MJ venues. 
Q) Aurora is growing rapidly at nearly 350,000 people. Developers are looking to annex thousands of acres east of city boundaries that could become residential and some commercial development associated with  Denver International Airport. Do you believe the city should continue to annex large tracts of land?
A) The latest population count from our city demographer is we are at 368,200, up close to 10,000 new folks from 2016 to 2017.  The latest annexation study shows annexation does not pay for itself and would add a financial burden on the existing taxpayers, so no, we should not continue to annex.
Q) Do you support Aurora forming its own county? Why? 
A) Unequivocally, a big no.  Take a good look at the boundaries of the city.  You will see the City of Centennial cuts Aurora in the lower half of the city, presenting city staff with an almost impossible burden to govern.  And no one can tell me it would not cost the taxpayers a dime because we would be adding a jail, staff, and all the social service programs and their associated staff..
Q) What is the city’s most pressing transportation need? 
A) Funding for road maintenance is the most critical need at the moment.
Q) Are there any laws at the city level that you believe could help reduce gun violence? Which ones? If not, why? 
A) I am not in favor of our municipal ordinances interfering with the 2nd Amendment.  Reducing gun violence is a laudable goal.  We could begin by removing gang members from society, having mothers and fathers take responsibilities for their children, and for starters, crack down on drug dealing.
Q) Do you think the city does a good job of marketing itself? If not, what can be done differently? Is it important? 
A) Aurora has been stigmatized in the past and is slowly changing that perception through our recent marketing programs.  Yes, it is important and should be continued.
Q) Should residents who don’t shovel the snow on their sidewalks within 24 hours of a snowfall face stiffer penalties to ensure compliance to protect pedestrians?  
A) Stiffer fines might help, it would depend on the language of the ordinance, and the fine before I could commit.
Q) What, if any, local controls should Aurora insist on when it comes to oil and gas drilling in the city?  
A) The state has its hands on the controls and that is as it should be.  After complying with the state regulations, the city should enforce our local rules and regulations as to noise, signage, fees, clean up, hours of operation, and most of all road maintenance.
Q) Would you like to see Aurora’s sign code become more restrictive, less restrictive or left as it is? 
A) Leave as is with the ability to ask for a waiver for special circumstances.
Q) Should Aurora limit or ban giving financial incentives to businesses in an effort to lure them to Aurora? An example where large incentives were offered include the Gaylord and Amazon projects. Critics call these “corporate welfare,” but proponents say they’re a critical part of economic development and creating jobs. 
A) Incentives have a beginning and an end, they do not go on in perpetuity and must be taken in to account when deciding the level of incentives to offer, if at all.  Candidly as long as other municipalities offer incentives, we will need to also be in that position just to level the playing field in making us a contender.
Q) Despite improvements in working with county government to ensure services for Aurora residents, problems remain, including transportation for many senior residents. What’s the answer, or should the city stay out of the problem? 
A) To a limited degree we should cooperate with RTD and DRCOG in providing transportation to senior residents.
Q) Should Aurora begin reconfiguring streets such as Peoria or Chambers to allow for bicycle-only travel? 
A) No.  Bike lanes only????  Where would the cars go?  Bike travel is important but we must remember vehicles are used not just to get to a job site, it also takes children to school, trips to the shops etc. etc. which necessitates a vehicle, not a bike.
Q) The East Colfax corridor has long been a challenge. Many say that without a substantial infusion of cash for urban renewal and incentives, little will change. Should Aurora create a special a funded urban renewal district to purchase and select portions of the East Colfax corridor and enhance the work of the Aurora Cultural Arts District, or should Aurora stay the course because, it is what it is? 
A) Using the term “it is what it is” denotes an attitude of giving up and I cannot go there.  Do we have challenges?  Yes.  Would forming an urban renewal district help?  I think not.  What will help is providing more reasons for folks to be on Colfax such as a nice restaurant or two, a piano bar where theatre folks can go for a drink after a show, more signage and sprucing up of the store fronts.  The sprucing up is already planned for and keeping the area clean of debris is in the works, to say nothing of the inauguration of the Bike Patrol.  Giving this more time and a robust economy should do wonders for the area.
Sally Mounier Endorsements

Coming soon

Sally Mounier Personality Q&A
QUESTIONS ABOUT YOU:
1. What food do you hate most?  I can’t think of a food I hate but I am not crazy about leftovers and tend to leave them in the fridge until I have to throw them out.
2. Do you indulge in recreational marijuana?  No.
3. Who would play you in a movie about your life? Judi Dench, a wonderful, gifted actress.
4. What Olympic Sport so you wish you could win gold at? Swimming – 50 yard freestyle and 50 yard backstroke.
5. What was your favorite childhood candy?  Fudge.
6. If you could be an eyewitness to one event in history, what would it be? In Berlin, Germany, when President Reagan makes his famous statement…”Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall”!
7. If the Secret Service gave you a code name, what would it be?  Birdie.
8. If you had to sing karaoke, what song would you sing? Car karaoke counts.  You Are My Sunshine, My Only Sunshine.
9. What epithet would you like written on your tombstone?  She stayed the course.  She finished the race.
10. Is a hot dog a sandwich? No, it is a hot dog and a bun, not a sandwich.
11. What is the last concert you attended?  Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis, Jr. at the Hollywood Bowl.
12. What movie do you never tire of watching?  The Godfather, Part II, and Part III.
13. Dogs or cats?  Neither, birds for me.
14. What’s the most underrated thing about living in Aurora?  The extraordinary quality of our residents; we are in close proximity to entities such as doctors and pharmacies necessary for daily living, and we know our neighbors and are willing to help them out if needed.

Sally Mounier Campaign Contributions and Expenditures

1. Funds on Hand at Beginning of Reporting Period — $0.00

2. Total Contributions — $9,060.00

3. Total Receipts — $9,060.00

4. Total Expenditures — $2,432.69

5. Funds on Hand at End of Reporting Period — $6,627.31

6. Total In-kind Contributions — $140.00

Crystal Murillo Bio & Issues Q&A

Crystal Murillo is an Aurora native challenging Ward I incumbent Sally Mounier. She currently works at the University of Denver’s alumni center. Murillo is a DU alumna herself, having graduated in 2015 with a BS in business administration. Murillo, the daughter of immigrants, is the the first in her family to earn a college degree. She previously interned for House Majority Leader Crisanta Duran.

 

QUESTIONS PERTAINING TO YOUR ELECTION RACE:

 

Q) Green lights or red lights? Photo red-light cameras in Aurora continue to be controversial, especially since a body of state lawmakers continue to threaten to make them illegal. As a city lawmaker, would you recommend the city continue its own program?

A) According to the City of Aurora’s website, there are currently no photo red-light cameras in Ward 1. There seems to be a heavy concentration of photo red-light cameras in Ward 3.

I am concerned that photo red-light cameras are not actually increasing public safety and rather causing other issues. I have read conflicting data regarding the effectiveness of these systems. Some data suggests that photo red-light cameras cause more rear-end collisions instead of improving safety at intersections.

Additionally, I’m not sure they make sense financially. The program carries no fund balance and the remaining fine revenue is transferred out to the City’s Nexus programs. According to the 2017 City Budget, revenue has been declining and administrative costs have been increasing, which is reducing the amount available to transfer out to fund the City’s Nexus programs. The 2016 surcharge transfer was $267,600 less than the Original Budget.

Though I am not necessarily in support of this program I would like to learn more about its effectiveness. I think it’s important to understand the budget implications as it currently exists especially for Nexus program funding but that should not be the only reason to make a decision one way or another. I would be supportive of citizen-led ballot initiative if Aurora voters are opposed to their useage. We are here to serve our community’s interests.

 

Q) Denver has agreed to allow some bars and coffee shops the open use of marijuana, or to create private cannabis clubs. Would you permit them? If not, why? If yes, how?

A) I think it would be worth considering the costs and benefits of private cannabis clubs for two reasons.

First, since Colorado legalized Marijuana, we have seen many people come to recognize our state as a tourist destination specifically for the consumption of marijuana. Perhaps we could capture some tourist revenue if we did allow some of these clubs. With our new R Line from DIA and highly coveted Gaylord development we will see an increase of tourism in Aurora. If someone wanted to partake in the consumption of marijuana perhaps they would stay locally instead of going to Denver.

Second, because smoking marijuana in public is not permitted, people often smoke at their home then drive to a destination or smoke in parking lots once at a destination. While private cannabis clubs couldn’t guarantee the elimination of these practices, the city has a legitimate public safety interest in giving people a place to safely and legally consume marijuana.

 

Q) Aurora is growing rapidly at nearly 350,000 people. Developers are looking to annex thousands of acres east of city boundaries that could become residential and some commercial development associated with Denver International Airport. Do you believe the city should continue to annex large tracts of land?

A) If elected, as the councilmember from Ward 1, Ward 1 needs will always be how I first approach an issue. Ward 1 residents are facing a housing crisis. As Aurora grows and develops, the cost of living continues to rise, but Ward 1 residents are being left behind.

The median income in Ward 1 is $34,676 versus $53,559 for Aurora and $87,401 in Ward 6. Ward 1 residents are also disproportionately renters with 61.1% of Ward 1 residents renting and only 28.5% of residents living in owner occupied housing. Ward 1 also has the highest number of vacant housing units, putting us at risk of gentrification. We need to prioritize city funds on converting renters to owners, providing affordable housing options, and sustainably using the land we already have, all of which will stabilize our local economy.

Our city’s economic development and growth is going to be an ongoing conversation for our local leadership and community. In regard to annexation, I believe that we need to analyze this very complex issue on a case-by-case basis. There may be some good opportunity to capitalize on land south of DIA, but we need to ensure a level playing field in the Aurora we already have first.

 

Q) Do you support Aurora forming its own county? Why?

A) I am generally supportive of Aurora forming its own county, but don’t think it should be a priority and believe it will take a multi-year strategy to make that transition in a way that would minimize implementation costs as much as is practicable.

Based on a 2014 feasibility study, by forming our own county, we would eventually see a positive fiscal impact, overall cost-savings due to consolidated, more efficient services and facilities and an increased level of autonomy and coordination with state and federal partners. However, the 2014 feasibility study also revealed the high cost of implementing that process. With such pressing concerns in the lack of affordable housing and transit needs I do not believe this is an appropriate time to consider this again. Perhaps the city can work on efficiencies within our current structure as a potential path to becoming a city-county.

 

Q) What is the city’s most pressing transportation need?

A) Aurora urgently needs to implement a holistic plan to improving our city’s infrastructure and mobility. Yes, we need to fix the roads, but fixing roads is a band-aid and does not address how Aurora will accommodate the growing number of people moving into Aurora.

Aurora must look at a local transportation funding mechanism to get control over and thus stabilize our budget for transportation infrastructure. As Colorado’s third largest city, Aurora’s ability to fix our roads and increase mobility should not be so dependent on the state legislature.

In tandem with fixing roads, Aurora must look at ways of making public transportation more accessible physically and financially for its residents.

The city of Englewood is a great example of a successful local transit opportunity. They provide a free shuttle service throughout their city that connects to major business hubs and to the light rail. The shuttle not only increases mobility for residents but improves business access. It runs along a public art route, which if Aurora replicated, could improve the community feel of our city and be an opportunity to employ local artists as well. Recently, RTD proposed some major cuts to the service of our R Line due to the lack of ridership. Instead of cuts to service, I would love to explore a more mutually beneficial partnership to increase it.

 

Q) Are there any laws at the city level that you believe could help reduce gun violence? Which ones? If not, why?

A) As someone who has grown up in Colorado in the age of Columbine, the Aurora theater shooting and other mass shootings we can’t ignore gun violence. I have personally experienced the trauma of an active shooter situation and I believe it is in all of our best interest to understand the causes of gun violence and address them to create a safer community.

While Aurora boasts being the safest large-city in Colorado, there are also pockets of great poverty. We know from 2016 that the number of shootings decreased, but gun violence was spread more widely across the city and were more likely to be crimes of opportunity. By raising the incomes of the city as a whole, we will weaken one of the drivers of gun violence. This will, in turn, bring more money into the city, which could help the city get our police department to sufficient staffing levels, so it can do more community policing and proactive work.

 

Q) Do you think the city does a good job of marketing itself? If not, what can be done differently? Is it important?

A) I value progress and always think there is opportunity for improvement. Being that we are a neighboring municipality to the capital of Colorado, Aurora does tend to be overshadowed by Denver. I do believe Aurora can improve its marketing and enhance its branding. There are many opportunities for the city to improve its marketing and highlight Aurora’s unique character.

Aurora is unique because of its rich diversity of immigrants and refugees. There is opportunity to indulge in a wide array of cultures and cuisine.There are many festivals to partake in to celebrate this beautiful diversity, such as the ImmiFest, Ethiopian Festival, etc. I would love for our City to support these communities, highlight their contributions, and promote and support the amazing business they bring to the Aurora community. Immigrants and refugees are integral members of our community and a great asset to our city. There are opportunities to integrate this community in marketing to highlight their story and contribution to this great city in a meaningful way.

There are other ways to enhance the marketing strategy and brand management of the City. There are many incentives to attract businesses and families to Aurora, including lucrative economic opportunities and a booming housing market. However, we must be weary of urban phenomenons like gentrification and displacement of low-income communities of color with an influx of people moving into the city and an increase in development. We could look to our neighbor Denver and see their struggles to serve their existing constituency with affordable housing for renters and support for small cultural businesses (like Panaderias, Carnicerias, etc.). It is my hope that the city’s marketing and consequential growth serves all Aurora residents, not those who are in a position to likely to profit from it. It is my goal support a marketing and brand strategy that promotes the rich diversity of Aurora and celebrates our unique culture and character.

 

Q) Should residents who don’t shovel the snow on their sidewalks within 24 hours of a snowfall face stiffer penalties to ensure compliance to protect pedestrians?

A) Punitive approaches for citizen compliance has minimal effectiveness in behavioral change and and orderliness. Approaches like this disproportionately impact lower-income residents. There are a number of reasons people don’t shovel their snow quickly: (1) because of their inability to afford snow removal services and resources; (2) they are not physically able and someone may not be available to help them within 24 hours; (3) they work multiple jobs and simply don’t have time. A stiffer penalty for not shoveling snow does not do anything to help these residents get there snow shoveled faster.

Further, there is minimal support for such mandates with stiff penalties in communities at-large, likely because they do not get to the root of the problem. If there is a concern about pedestrian safety during severe snowfall, I would be more inclined to support community initiatives to solve the problem. For example, the City of Aurora has the Snow Busters program to support low-income seniors in our community with snow removal by volunteers. I’d support expanding this service to other communities, like refugees and low-income families using city resources to coordinate snow removal. I would like to see data regarding pedestrian incidents sorted by neighborhood to extend such services in these areas. When dealing with problems of this nature (like other residential landscaping code violations), it is more effective to implement a community-oriented solution. I want to encourage a sense of pride and a community approach to ensure everyone’s safety and the beauty of our beloved city is more conducive approach.

 

Q) What, if any, local controls should Aurora insist on when it comes to oil and gas drilling in the city?

A) Aurora needs to take a long hard look at the risks associated with oil and gas drilling. I expect the city and community to have authority to determine if and where oil and gas drilling occur within our city. We should work with our community and respect their will. I think we’ve seen, in light of the recent Firestone tragedy, that this is a matter of life and death. I would like to see us respond in a manner that keeps our residents aware and safe. We need to look at the health of our people, environment, and economy through a lens of sustainability.

 

Q) Would you like to see Aurora’s sign code become more restrictive, less restrictive or left as it is?

A) Upon reviewing the City’s sign code it seems very straightforward. I have talked to many Ward 1 residents and even small business owners over the past months and this topic has not yet developed in conversation. If community members have an issue with the sign code, I would welcome the opportunity to discuss further.

 

Q) Should Aurora limit or ban giving financial incentives to businesses in an effort to lure them to Aurora? An example where large incentives were offered include the Gaylord and Amazon projects. Critics call these “corporate welfare,” but proponents say they’re a critical part of economic development and creating jobs.

A) I’m not against giving financial incentives to business to attract them to Aurora, but I’m going to be leary of any deals of this kind. I understand it has become commonplace for cities to offer financial incentives, my concern is that as we compete with larger, more economically abundant cities like Denver, we will underbid to remain viable. It is imperative we avoid this “race to the bottom” scenario that which diminishes tangible improvement in our local economy. As I have mentioned in previous questions, it’s important to invest in our local economy and my first question is always going to be, “how does this affect the residents of Ward 1?” I will also bring community stakeholders to the table when evaluating any such proposal to look at the deal from multiple angles. Affordable housing and public transportation are problems the city must address urgently. The city needs money now, not in 10 years. Businesses offering to bring jobs often bring people as well. I’d want a commitment from any company coming to Aurora that they will invest in the community as it exists now and hire locally. Aurora does not need another deal where a big company over-promises and under-delivers.

 

Q) Despite improvements in working with county government to ensure services for Aurora residents, problems remain, including transportation for many senior residents. What’s the answer, or should the city stay out of the problem?

A) Our residents should absolutely be a concern for the city. It is the city government’s job to make sure we are meeting the needs of Aurora residents and we need to work with our county partners to make sure we are offering adequate services.

 

Q) Should Aurora begin reconfiguring streets such as Peoria or Chambers to allow for bicycle-only travel?

A) We need to invest in multi-modal transit. It has become increasingly clear with our rapid growth that our current infrastructure cannot adequately support our community. Bikes lanes could be a great way to increase our transit opportunities. The city should look at creative solutions tested in other cities, like Superblocks in Barcelona, the Art Shuttle in Englewood, and subsidizing RTD fare.

 

Q) The East Colfax corridor has long been a challenge. Many say that without a substantial infusion of cash for urban renewal and incentives, little will change. Should Aurora create a special a funded urban renewal district to purchase and select portions of the East Colfax corridor and enhance the work of the Aurora Cultural Arts District, or should Aurora stay the course because, it is what it is?

A) The East Colfax (of Denver, West of Aurora) is located in Ward 1 and is the older part of Aurora. I would love to see our community space revitalized in a way that is inclusive of the current community’s needs. The city has various Metro and Special Districts and I would need to know more about the proposed function in Original Aurora. This could be an opportunity to invest in a Community Land Trust (CLT) whereby we help stabilize housing costs for our residents and empowering them to have more input in the development in our community. By giving them an opportunity to have direct input we can create businesses that meet the needs of our community.

 

Crystal Murillo Endorsements

1. Funds on Hand at Beginning of Reporting Period — $21,612.29
2. Total Contributions — $12,425.00
3. Total Receipts — $34,037.29
4. Total Expenditures — $8,945.60
5. Funds on Hand at End of Reporting Period — $25,091.69
6. Total In-kind Contributions — $0.00

Crystal Murillo Personality Q&A

QUESTIONS ABOUT YOU: 

1. What food do you hate most? I love food and I’d like to think I have a pretty eclectic palate. However, I can think of two things I really dislike: mushrooms and olives. It’s not the texture, not the smell, I think I genuinely dislike their taste.

Disclaimer: I know our palate changes every so often so in a few years I may come to love these foods. For example, I distinctly remember not liking pickles and onions and now I love them!

2. Do you indulge in recreational marijuana? No.

3. Who would play you in a movie about your life? Gina Rodriguez

4.What Olympic Sport do you wish you could win gold at? Gymnastics or diving. During my senior year in high school I decided to try diving. It was the coolest sport I ever participated in. We practiced on a trampoline with a harness and foam blocks. It was a great break from school and I only wish I had participated sooner. Needless to say that after one season I wasn’t the best diver but because of my hard work (never mind the number of girls actually interested in diving) I made it onto Varsity.

5.What was your favorite childhood candy? My favorite candy was a snickers bar. I still enjoy them now but don’t care much for sweets so I rarely eat them. I have been known to bargain with my younger cousins come Halloween time.

6.If you could be an eyewitness to one event in history, what would it be? When Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta met and co-founded the National Farmworkers Association which became the United Farm Workers. Organizing and mobilizing Latinos is still a challenge and in this current political atmosphere all the more important. I’d love to see how they overcame challenges, found their voices, and inspired Latinos across the nation.

7.If the Secret Service gave you a code name, what would it be?
I think the thing about nicknames is that you don’t get to choose them. So – I guess it’d be up to them!

8.If you had to sing karaoke, what song would you sing? Car karaoke counts. My go-to karaoke song is “We Belong Together” by Mariah Carey. The bar is set so high, so no one can fail.

9.What epithet would you like written on your tombstone? Couldn’t say, I haven’t thought that far ahead yet.

10.Is a hot dog a sandwich? Good question. Though a hot dog has the composition of a sandwich (bread, filling-usually some kind of meat-and condiments) I believe that its convenience, versatility and popularity has landed it into its own category.

11.What is the last concert you attended? I attend the Kendrick Lamar concert at the Pepsi Center. My partner bought us floor tickets.

12.What movie do you never tire of watching? I will probably never tire of watching Selena or listening to her music. Her story as a young Mexican-American, Spanglish speaking girl trying to accomplish her goals, and her struggle trying to navigate her passion between cultures really resonates with me. She also had a one-of-a-kind voice, so besides the meaning behind who she was, her music is just great. I make it a point to teach my younger cousins about her.

13.Dogs or cats? Both-and ferrets.

14.What’s the most underrated thing about living in Aurora? People underrate our great sense of diversity and resiliency. Many people in Ward 1 are immigrants and refugees to America and have come here for a better life and opportunity. I can only imagine some of the things people have had to overcome and the challenging experience of being new to a country. Yet, I see reasons to be grateful and happy for on a daily basis. We are resilient, vibrant and caring community and we come to each other’s aid in times of crisis.

Crystal Murillo Campaign Contributions and Expenditures

1. Funds on Hand at Beginning of Reporting Period — $9,814.98

2. Total Contributions — $6,622.50

3. Total Receipts — $16,437.48

4. Total Expenditures — $7,859.58

5. Funds on Hand at End of Reporting Period — $8,577.90

6. Total In-kind Contributions — $211.86