Pure Colorado

Sustainable Supper: Is organic food just for the affluent, oblivious upper middle class?

If foods reflected their "true" cost, cheese would be 18 percent more expensive

Erin Jolley of Cooking Matters, washes freshly picked cucumbers that were deliveredto the La Plata County Fairgrounds in Durango. Volunteers gathered donated produce over the weekend at the fairgrounds and will later be distributed to families in need. (AP Photo)

AURORA – Roger Cohen, a British columnist for The New York Times, responded to a recent study questioning whether organic produce was “better” than the conventional variety: “Organic has long since become an ideology, the romantic back-to-nature obsession of an upper middle class able to afford it and oblivious, in their affluent narcissism, to the challenge of feeding a planet whose population will surge to 9 billion before the middle of the century and whose poor will get a lot more nutrients from the two regular carrots they can buy for the price of one organic carrot.”

The true cost of food much higher than sticker price

Greenbiz.com reported recently on a study of the environmental cost of cereal, cheese and fruit juice. Trucost found that if the foods reflected their true cost, cheese would be 18 percent more expensive, cereal would cost 16 percent more and fruit juice’s price would increase 6 percent. The analysis considered water use, waste, greenhouse-gas emissions and other variables.

Boulder considers fee on grocery bags; Aurora next?

The Daily Camera reports that that the Boulder City Council committee will vote Oct. 16 on imposing a 20-cent fee grocers and convenience stores would charge shoppers for using a paper of plastic bag. If adopted, the fee wouldn’t go into effect until July 2013.

From nose to tail from farm to table

“For me, it’s all about utilizing parts of the animal that are always overlooked, or mostly overlooked. A pig is the best example to use because you can pretty much eat every single part of the pig, literally from the nose to the tail.” – Executive chef, Alex Krill, Salt Bistro at boulderweekly.com

Sustainable Table is a weekly feature of the Aurora Sentinel, Buckley Guardian and Life Science newspapers and sites. Comments to: jlehndorff@aurorasentinel.com.

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