Obituaries

Last crew member of Enola Gay dies in Georgia

Last crew member of Enola Gay dies in Georgia

“I honestly believe the use of the atomic bomb saved lives in the long run,” VanKirk told The Associated Press in a 2005 interview.

Former astronaut Hank Hartsfield dies at 80

Hartsfield’s daughter, Judy Gedies, said Friday her father died July 17 of complications following back surgery.

Flags lowered on Navajo Nation for Code Talker

The tribe says Edward Anderson died Sunday at a Phoenix hospital. He was 89.

'Up the Down Staircase' writer Kaufman dies at 103

‘Up the Down Staircase’ writer Kaufman dies at 103

“She got all the craziness of the paperwork and the administrators and supervisors,” McCourt, author of the memoirs “Angela’s Ashes” and “Teacher Man,” said in 2005.

Italian tenor Bergonzi dies at age 90

Bergonzi’s international career took off after his 1956 debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, where he sang the role of Radames in Verdi’s Aida.

Former Naval Academy superintendent dies at 77

McCain, who graduated in the same class as Larson at the academy in 1958, said in a statement Sunday that it has been a privilege and an honor to serve in Larson’s shadow, both as a young man and an old one.

Kentucky basketball legend Wah Wah Jones dies

Jones, an All-American, was the last surviving member of the Wildcats’ “Fabulous Five” that won the 1948 national championship and went on to claim Olympic gold that year with the U.S. team.

Former Blazers center Schlueter dies 

PORTLAND, Ore. | Dale Schlueter, a member of the Portland Trail Blazers for their inaugural 1970-71 season, died Thursday after battling cancer. He was 68. The Trail Blazers said Schlueter died at his Portland home. Schlueter was acquired by the Blazers …

Last original Ramones member dies

Last original Ramones member dies

Johnny, Joey, Dee Dee and Tommy Ramone, taking their surname from an alias Paul McCartney used to check into hotels, formed in Queens, N.Y. in 1974.

Kasem was an island of calm in swirl of pop music

Kasem was an island of calm in swirl of pop music

“American Top 40,” with Kasem’s soft, homey voice counting down the hits, was a refuge from shock jocks or the screaming big-city radio voices. It was dependable, broadcast on some 1,000 stations at its peak, so if you were driving in Connecticut or Kansas, California or Kentucky, you could always take a measure of the pop charts with Casey.