National Vote

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and the Keystone XL oil pipeline bill sponsor, joined by Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., , left, and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., right, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014. The U.S. Senate has rejected a proposal to fast-track the approval of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

“I look forward to the new Republican majority taking up and passing the Keystone jobs bill early in the new year,” the Kentucky Republican said Tuesday, shortly after the bill fell one vote short of the 60 votes needed to advance. He was joined by incoming Senate Energy Committee Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who said the fight wasn’t over.

Mary Landrieu

Landrieu is an underdog to win a fourth term in a runoff next month with GOP Rep. Bill Cassidy. She’s a supporter of the Canada-to-Texas pipeline but was unable to win a vote on it, which has been a flash point in her race. Cassidy’s version recently passed the House and GOP leaders immediately scheduled another vote on it for Thursday

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama meets with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., left, and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The president will be looking for common ground, as well as apparent differences, with Republicans at a White House luncheon Friday with top leaders of the soon-to-be GOP dominated Congress.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

“I’m sure there will be plenty of things for us to disagree about,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Thursday. “But if there’s an opportunity for us to find some common ground, let’s make sure that our differences don’t get in the way of us being able to make some progress for the American people.”

FILE - In this Jan. 2, 2013, file photo, December Tueller, left, Caroline White and Brandon Schilling, right, protest genetically modified foods on the steps of the Jackson County Court House in Medford, Ore.  Oregon voters on Tuesday rejected by a narrow margin the labeling of genetically modified foods following the most expensive ballot-measure campaign in state history.  (AP Photo/The Mail Tribune, Jamie Lusch, File)

“This is a social movement that’s gaining power, as people become more aware of how their food is produced,” said George Kimbrell, a senior attorney at the Center for Food Safety. “So there’s great success there regardless of the outcome of the measure.”

A man looks over the front pages from newspapers around the country that are on display outside the Newseum in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014.   America awoke Wednesday to sharper dividing lines in an already divided government, forcing a weakened President Barack Obama to recalibrate his approach and giving Republican leaders in Congress new muscle to check him.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

“The composition of the electorate was fundamentally different than anyone predicted,” said Gene Ulm, a pollster at Public Opinion Strategies, a firm that worked for Republican candidates or super PACs in Maine, Iowa, Colorado, New Mexico, North Carolina and Kentucky, among other states.

File - In this Oct. 4, 2012 file photo, large sections of pipe are shown in Sumner, Texas. Republicans are counting on a swift vote in early 2015 on building the Keystone XL pipeline to carry oil from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast now that Republicans clearly have the numbers in the Senate. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

“We now have the votes and we have the ability to call the agenda, so stop name-calling and let’s actually produce some legislation that helps jobs and the economy and moves our country forward,” Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said in an interview. “I think the country has figured that out, and they’ve given us the mandate to do it, and we better produce, or they’ll kick us out too.”

<<12345...102030...>>
FindIt!