Aurora Business

This Oct. 1, 2014 photo shows Jeep, Dodge Ram and Chevrolet logos on signs at Bill DeLuca's dealerships in Haverhill, Mass. Chrysler, Nissan and Honda on Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, all reported U.S. sales gains last month as low gas prices and booming SUV and pickup truck sales drove people into dealerships. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

“Gas prices coming down added a little bit of fuel to the fire, but that fire was already roaring,” said Alec Gutierrez, a senior analyst with Kelley Blue Book.

File-This Oct. 18, 2014, file photo shows One World Trade Center in the background, as people gather, bottom, for a groundbreaking ceremony at the site of the St. Nicholas National Shrine, in New York.  Thirteen years after the 9/11 terrorist attack, the resurrected World Trade Center is again opening for business, marking an emotional milestone for both New Yorkers and the nation. Publishing giant Conde Nast will start moving Monday, Nov. 3, 2014, into One World Trade, a 104-story, $3.9 billion skyscraper that dominates the Manhattan skyline. It is America's tallest building. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle, File)

“The New York City skyline is whole again, as One World Trade Center takes its place in Lower Manhattan,” said Patrick Foye, executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that owns both the building and the World Trade Center site.

Presenting a report on climPresenting a report on climate change, with from left, Secretary-General World Meteoroligical Organization, Michel Jarraud, Minister of State for Envionment of Peru Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, Chairman of the IPCC Rajendra K. Pachauri and Secretary of the IPCC Renata Christ, present a comprehensive report by the UN climate panel, summarizing the three interim reports previously released on climate changes, Sunday Nov. 2. 2014, at Tivoli Congress Center in Copenhagen, Denmark.  Climate change is happening, it's almost entirely man's fault and limiting its impacts may require reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero this century, the U.N.'s panel on climate science said Sunday. (AP Photo/POLFOTO, Jens Dresling) DENMARK OUTate change, with from left, Secretary-General World Meteoroligical Organization, Michel Jarraud, Minister of State for Envionment of Peru Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, Chairman of the IPCC Rajendra K. Pachauri and Secretary of the IPCC Renata Christ, present a comprehensive report by the UN climate panel, summarizing the three interim reports previously released on climate changes, Sunday Nov. 2. 2014, at Tivoli Congress Center in Copenhagen, Denmark.  Climate change is happening, it's almost entirely man's fault and limiting its impacts may require reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero this century, the U.N.'s panel on climate science said Sunday. (AP Photo/POLFOTO, Jens Dresling) DENMARK OUT

“Science has spoken. There is no ambiguity in their message. Leaders must act. Time is not on our side,” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said at the report’s launch in Copenhagen.

Law enforcement officers keep watch on the wreckage near the site where a Virgin Galactic space tourism rocket, SpaceShipTwo, exploded and crashed in Mojave, Calif. Saturday, Nov 1, 2014. The explosion killed a pilot aboard and seriously injured another while scattering wreckage in Southern California's Mojave Desert, witnesses and officials said. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

“It’s a real setback to the idea that lots of people are going to be taking joyrides into the fringes of outer space any time soon,” said John Logsdon, retired space policy director at George Washington University.

Billionaire Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson salutes the bravery of test pilots, and vows to find out what caused the crash of his prototype space tourism rocket that killed one crew member and injured another during a news conference in Mojave, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014.  Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo blew apart about 20 miles (32 kilometers) from the Mojave airfield after being released from a carrier aircraft Friday. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)

“We are determined to find out what went wrong,” he said, asserting that safety has always been the top priority of the program that envisions taking wealthy tourists six at a time to the edge of space for a brief experience of weightlessness and a view of Earth below.

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