Aurora Business


FILE - This Thursday, May 12, 2016, file photo, shows a sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years.That's despite Republican assurances that the "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

“Companies are moving to other places because they don’t face an issue that they face here,” he told a World Affairs Council of Charlotte luncheon last month. “What’s going on that you don’t know about? What convention decided to take you off the list? What location for a distribution facility took you off the list? What corporate headquarters consideration for a foreign company — there’s a lot of them out there — just took you off the list because they just didn’t want to be bothered with the controversy? That’s what eats you up.”


FILE- In this Jan. 15, 2015, file photo, a new Qatar Airways Airbus A350 approaches the gate at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany. As the indignities of modern air travel go, the latest ban on laptops and tablets on some international flights falls somewhere between having to take off your ratty shoes at the security checkpoint and having your baby food and milk tested for bomb residue. It's yet another inconvenience in the name of security for weary travelers, especially those from or passing through the 10 mostly Middle Eastern and North African countries covered by new U.S. and British policies. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

“Why are only Middle Eastern airlines subject to this ban?” asked Kelsey Norman, a doctoral student who plans to fly home Friday to Los Angeles from Beirut — and expects to have to check her laptop, a Kindle tablet and her DSLR camera. “Overall this policy is inconvenient, discriminatory, and continues to hurt America’s rapidly deteriorating reputation globally.”


FILE - In this Dec. 8, 1964, file photo, children and adults alike look at merchandise in a Sears department store in downtown Chicago. Sears, a back-to-school shopping destination for generations of kids and the place newlyweds went to choose appliances, said Tuesday, March 21, 2017, that after years of losing money that there is "substantial doubt" it will be able to keep its doors open. (AP Photo/LO, File)

“It’s a sad story. This is the place that created the first direct to consumer retail, the first modern department store. It stood like the Colossus over the American retail landscape,” said Craig Johnson, president of Customer Growth Partners, a retail consulting firm. “But it’s been underinvested and bled dry.”