Wellness

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2010 file photo, steaks and other beef products are displayed for sale at a grocery store in McLean, Va. The meat industry is seeing red over the dietary guidelines. Hoping to rehabilitate its image as critics have encouraged Americans to eat less meat, the industry is swiftly and aggressively trying to discredit a government advisory panel report that they see as damaging. The report, released last month, recommends that people consume fewer red and processed meats and includes the health benefits of lean meat in a footnote, instead of as part of the main recommendations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

“We’ve been put in a position over the years to almost be apologizing for our product, we’re not going to do that anymore,” said Barry Carpenter, the president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute.

DENVER | Colorado Democrats appear to have changed their minds on giving the state’s health insurance exchange its deepest review yet. But it won’t be clear until a Tuesday afternoon hearing whether the change extends to the chamber still under Democratic control. A bill to order a thorough audit for Connect For Health Colorado faces a […]

FILE - In this June 8, 2007 file photo, a glass of milk sits on the table in Montgomery, Ala. In an encouraging development for consumers worried about antibiotics in their milk, a new Food and Drug Administration study showed little evidence of drug contamination after surveying almost 2,000 dairy farms. In response to concerns, the agency in 2012 took samples of raw milk on the farms and tested them for 31 drugs. Results released by the agency Thursday show that less than 1 percent of the total samples showed any evidence of drug residue. (AP Photo/Rob Carr, File)

“Overall this is very encouraging and reinforces the idea that the milk supply is safe,” said the FDA’s William Flynn, who led the study. He said the agency will use the findings to try and reduce the drug contamination even more.

FILE - This Sept. 11 2009 file photo shows a packet of AndroGel testosterone in Hygiene, Colo. The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors against the overuse of testosterone-boosting drugs for men, saying the popular treatments have never been established as safe or effective for treating common signs of aging like low libido and fatigue. (AP Photo/The Daily Times Call, Richard M. Hackett, File) NO SALES

“There’s been a very successful advertising campaign to make men feel that whatever their problem is, the answer is to buy more testosterone,” said Dr. Sidney Wolfe of Public Citizen. The consumer advocacy group petitioned the FDA last February to add a boxed warning — the most serious type— to testosterone drugs about heart risks. But the FDA rejected the petition in July, saying there was “insufficient evidence” for such a warning.

FILE - In this Wednesday Feb. 4, 2015 file photo, Jennifer Wonnacott holds her son, Gavin, 8 months, as she joins other mothers and children at a news conference to show their support for proposed legislation that would require parents to vaccinate all school children in Sacramento, Calif. National vaccination rates for kindergartners remain above 90 percent. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

“I think we’re all kind of frustrated,” said Stephen Morse, a Columbia University infectious disease expert. “As scientists, we’re probably the least equipped to know how to do this.”

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