Sustainable Living

In this Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016 photo, vegan mother Fulvia Serra holds her 1-year-old son, Sebastiano, at home in Fort Collins, Colo. Serra, originally from Italy, and her husband, Scott, are raising their son vegan. Despite criticism and innuendo from some circles, pediatricians and nutritionists agree it's perfectly healthy to feed babies a vegan diet. However, parents need to be well-informed about the nutritional elements different foods offer, and work closely with their doctor or health care provider. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

“They stress the elements of veganism in these stories, but it’s not that these people aren’t giving their children the right kind of food, it’s that they aren’t feeding them,” said Fulvia Serra, of Fort Collins, Colorado. The native of southern Italy is raising her 1-year-old son vegan, and her 12-year-old daughter is vegetarian.

This May 13, 2016 photo shows a Japanese plum tree photographed in a Langley, Wash., orchard. Miniature trees have become a popular way to grow fruit in backyards. Dwarf and semi-dwarf trees, like this Japanese plum tree are smaller than the standard varieties but faster to mature and produce. (Dean Fosdick via AP)

“Smaller trees are more efficient for labor. They’re also more efficient for space,” said Michael Parker, an extension horticulture specialist and associate professor at North Carolina A&T State University. “Why put up one tree when you can plant six small trees with lots of apple varieties? If you lose one tree, it’s no big deal. You’ll have other trees producing.”