Recipes

In this undated photo provided by Workman Publishing, Katie Workman poses for a photo. (Todd Coleman/Workman Publishing via AP)

Farro is great in soups, salads and as a substitute for short-grained rice in risotto-like dishes (often called farrotto). Here it is used as the base of a vegetable-studded side dish. You can change up the vegetables however you see fit, and if a grill isn’t handy go ahead and roast them in the oven.


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This July 20, 2015 photo shows baked stuffed peppers with freekeh in Concord, NH. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

One of the bonuses of this recipe is that you can prep and stuff the peppers a day ahead of time, then finish them in the oven right before the meal. One stuffed pepper half per person makes for a splendid side dish. Two per person makes for a delicious and nutritious meatless entree.


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This July 20, 2015 photo shows teff and almond tea cakes in Concord, N.H. Teff is a tiny grain, and one that has been cultivated for centuries in Ethiopia and Eritrea. It is best known for its traditional use in the fermented flatbread known as injera. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Teff, which is gluten-free, works well as porridge or polenta, and also can be added to vegetarian burgers, cakes and cookies. To cook, place 1 cup of teff and 3 cups of water in a heavy-bottomed saucepan, cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, says Maria Speck, author of “Simply Ancient Grains.”


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This July 20, 2015 photo shows millet coconut bites in Concord, N.H. Crunchy and nutty with a corn-like sweetness, this gluten-free grain with a fluffy texture makes a perfect side dish or salad. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Crunchy and nutty with a corn-like sweetness, this gluten-free grain with a fluffy texture makes a perfect side dish or salad. Add 1 cup of millet to a heavy-bottomed pot, cover with 1 3/4 cups of water, then cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, says Maria Speck, author of “Simply Ancient Grains.” Remove from the heat and let the grains sit, covered, for 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork before serving.


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This July 20, 2015 photo shows whole grain freekeh in Concord, N.H. freekeh and triticale are among the latest hot whole grains gaining ground as more Americans look beyond brown rice. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Cracked freekeh, which is the most common variety sold in the United States, does not require soaking and can be cooked using both of the above methods in about 15 to 20 minutes. In all cases, let the fully cooked grains stand in the covered pot for 10 minutes before serving to absorb any remaining moisture.


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This July 20, 2015 photo shows whole grain quinoa in Concord, NH. A little quinoa here and there can improve almost any dish. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Available in golden, red and black varieties, quinoa is slightly crunchy and highly versatile, good for everything from soups, salads and side dishes to vegetarian burgers. For perfect quinoa, combine 1 cup of quinoa with 1 3/4 cups water in a heavy-bottomed pot. Cover and gently simmer for 10 to 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the grains sit, covered, for 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork before serving.


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