Recipes

This March 9, 2015 photo shows sweet and sour cashew cauliflower in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

The sauce was easy. Rather than red food coloring and corn syrup, I went with a simple blend of red wine vinegar, soy sauce, hot sauce and just enough sugar to strike a pleasant sweet-savory balance. And of course there was pineapple, which adds plenty of natural sugars, too. This sauce cooks up on the stovetop in minutes.

This March 9, 2015 photo shows one step in the recipe for saag paneer with cauliflower and spinach in Concord, N.H. The South Asian dish consists of cubes of fresh cheese combined with greens in a creamy sauce. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

There are two basic ways to turn dairy such as milk or cream into cheese — add either rennet or an acid. For today, let’s stick with the acid method, since rennet is harder to come by, and chances are good that you already have an appropriate acid in the kitchen. The only equipment you’ll need is a pot, a thermometer, some cheesecloth and a strainer.

This image provided by Chronicle Books on Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015 shows the cover to the book "Pasta By Hand" by Jenn Louis. She dedicated her entire cookbook to dumplings made from all manner of ingredients, including flour, potatoes, bread and semolina. Like so much Italian food, the rustic shapes and ingredients of the dumplings vary by region, from little nubs perfect for completing a vegetable soup to long, thin pencil-like dumplings paired with tomato sauce or a hearty ragu. (AP Photo/Chronicle Books)

“Each person I interviewed and cooked with had a different notion about what was and was not gnocchi. When I approached the subject as dumplings, I was quickly corrected and told that dumplings are Chinese food. (This was accompanied by a smirk and shake of the head in many cases.),” Louis writes in her new cookbook, “Pasta by Hand.”

This March 9, 2015 photo shows edamame and walnut lettuce wraps in Concord, N.H. This recipe pairs firm edamame with crunchy walnuts and some spices to make a cold vegetarian “meat” for lettuce wraps or tacos. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

To showcase edamame’s versatility, I’ve created this recipe for edamame and walnut lettuce wraps. Though Japanese in spirit, it skews Mexican in flavor. I pair tasty, firm edamame with crunchy walnuts and some spices to make a cold vegetarian “meat” for lettuce wraps or tacos. Vegans will love this recipe, but so will meat-lovers.

This March 9, 2015 photo shows pressure cooker teriyaki chicken in Concord, N.H. This recipe takes chicken from frozen to delicious in under 30 minutes. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Frozen chicken is wonderful… when you remember to move it from the freezer to the refrigerator the night before so it thaws by the time you are ready to cook it. As simple a step as that is, it’s one I almost always fail to remember. And thus comes the 6 p.m. what-the-heck-do-I-do-with-a-pack-of-frozen-chicken frustration.

This March 2, 2015 photo shows fresh and creamy asparagus soup with tarragon in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Speaking of color, it also helps to barely cook the asparagus before pureeing it, and to reheat it only briefly after it is pureed. In general, the longer a green vegetable cooks, the grayer it becomes.

This March 2, 2015 photo shows grilled pear and blue cheese sandwich on cinnamon raisin bread in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

I decided to try something similar with my sandwiches. Instead of a very hot open skillet, I used medium-low heat and covered the pan. This created just the right environment to slowly toast the bread while gently melting the cheese inside. Presto! Grilled cheese perfection!

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