Colorado Table


The tart I’m talking about today uses a simple olive-oil cake as the base, which is then topped with fresh berries. I took inspiration from a fruit-topped sponge-cake, and turned the idea into a recipe that could be made start-to-finish in about an hour, and much of that time is baking or cooling. I whipped up a speedy orange-olive oil cake (and it’s technically-speaking a quick-bread, but our secret!) and made that the base, which works well with either regular flour or most gluten-free flours I have tried.


If you prefer to cook the lentils in chicken or vegetable broth, you will have a more flavorful dish all around. If you use vegetarian broth and skip the anchovies, you will have a vegetarian dish, but if that’s not of consequence to you and yours, do keep the anchovies, no matter what liquid you pick. They bring depth and umami and a something-something to the dressing.


Salads can also be out-and-out beautiful, with very little work. Here, a few types of lettuces mingle with slivers of red onion, tart apples and cranberries, and creamy goat cheese, tied together with a zippy dressing. You could add some chopped pecans or walnuts, or slivered almonds on top if you like (skip this if you are concerned that any of your guests have nut allergies!).


“Auld Lang Syne,” which roughly translates to “times long past” or “days gone by,” is a poem by the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Set to that familiar folk song melody, the version we know (sort of) has been translated to modern English, and encourages us to think about the people with whom we’ve shared our lives. After all, what better moment for solemn reflection than while wearing a paper tiara and swinging a champagne flute?


“Auld Lang Syne,” which roughly translates to “times long past” or “days gone by,” is a poem by the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Set to that familiar folk song melody, the version we know (sort of) has been translated to modern English, and encourages us to think about the people with whom we’ve shared our lives. After all, what better moment for solemn reflection than while wearing a paper tiara and swinging a champagne flute?


Today, I’m taking on a wintertime classic with my Lightened Shepherd’s Pie. Typically, shepherd’s pie is made from fatty-and-filling lamb, which is turned into a flavorful slow-cooked heady stew, and is topped with creamy, cheesy mashed potatoes, made lush by a nice-sized helpings of butter and heavy cream. The resulting marriage is divine. How close could I get to the original, while making some healthier ingredient swaps? The answer is: pretty close.