Guide

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014 file photo, a local resident walks her dog by the gates of Sony Pictures Entertainment Studios on Overland Avenue in Culver City, Calif. Suspicions that North Korea was behind a destructive hacking attack against Sony Pictures and a threat against movie theaters are intensifying calls for tougher U.S. steps to cut that country’s access to hard currency and declare it once more as a state sponsor of terrorism.  (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

“We don’t sell them anything, we don’t buy anything from them and we don’t have diplomatic relations,” said William Reinsch, a former senior Commerce Department official who was responsible for enforcing international sanctions against North Korea and other countries.

In this Dec. 12, 2014 photo City Councilman Jeff Waltman photographs the city's official Christmas tree in Reading, Pa. Waltman fought to save the 50-foot Norway spruce that many residents compared to the spindly tree in "A Charlie Brown Christmas," and the city is now embracing the "Peanuts" theme. (AP Photo/Michael Rubinkam)

“Christmas is so commercialized that we tend to forget what Christmases used to be like,” said Mayor Vaughn Spencer, channeling good ol’ Charlie Brown himself. “Sometimes we have to keep things in perspective, and I think that’s the lesson here.”

In this undated photo provided by the American Kennel Club, three Spanish water dogs sit in the sand near tall grass. On Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014 the organization announced that the Spanish water dog will be recognized as a new AKC breed in 2015. (AP Photo/American Kennel Club)

The kennel club announced Wednesday that the Spanish water dog, the Cirneco dell’Etna (cheer-NAY-koh-dehl-eht-nah), the Bergamasco and the Boerboel (BUHR’-buhl) will become recognized breeds Jan. 1.

FILE - In this April 29, 2014 file photo, Moriah Barnhart, gives her cancer suffering three year old daughter Dahlia cannabis oil treatment with an oral syringe, at her home in Colorado Springs. Colorado is poised to award more than $8 million for medical marijuana research, a step toward addressing complaints that little is known about pot's medical potential. Among the research projects poised for approval on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, are one for pediatric epilepsy patients, and another for children with brain tumors. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

“This is the first time we’ve had government money to look at the efficacy of marijuana, not the harms of marijuana,” said Dr. Suzanne Sisley, a Scottsdale, Arizona, psychiatrist who will help run a study on marijuana for veterans with PTSD. Sisley plans to do her research in private practice after previously working for the University of Arizona.

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